Lands End to John O’Groats Route

Over 960 miles of the UK’s most breathless sightseeing

The Land’s End to John O’Groats route from bottom to top. This is the true test of any cyclist. The route runs from the farthest tip of Cornwall at Land’s End to the very Northernmost tip of the UK at John O’Groats. The end to end route has been an iconic challenge for centuries.

Unlike most end to end rides, Deloitte Ride Across Britain doesn’t choose the shortest route from A to B. Riders do a few extra miles each day, but this allows us to find the best cycling in the UK. You will ride the rugged coastline of Cornwall to the rolling hills and valleys of the Peak District and finish with the majesty of the Scottish highlands. No other single event manages to string so much exceptional long distance cycling together along so many unknown and hidden back roads. It takes in the most beautiful parts of Britain from barren moorlands and majestic highlands to lush green valleys, winding back lanes and stunning coastal roads.

The full route is 969 miles broken in to 9 daily stages averaging  around 108 miles a day. Whether you call the UK home or not, the “LEJOG” end to end ride is one of the classic cycling challenges on the planet.  Riders climb around 15,000m over the 9 days. That is around 13 times up Alpe d’Huez or almost twice the height of Everest! This sounds like a lot, but with the right training it is well within reach.

Click on the three lined menu at top left of the map to explore each stage and see elevation profiles.

All distances and elevations are subject to change so please take these as guidelines not exact numbers.

Day 1: Land's End to Okehampton
distance: 107 miles
total climb: approx 7,000ft

Riding from Land’s End towards Okehampton riders will cross the edge of Bodmin Moor and skirt around Dartmoor, hitting the short, steep climbs and descents that Devon and Cornwall are so famous for. The Ride starts with some of toughest climbs of the entire route but you are rewarded with views of an impressive coastline, St. Michaels Mount and Cornwall’s famous china clay pits.

Day 1

Day 2: Okehampton to Bath
distance: 110 miles
total climb: approx. 6,000ft

Skirting the edge of Dartmoor, crossing the Quantock Hills and arriving at the magnificent climb of Cheddar Gorge, riders still have some significant hills to take on as they continue towards Bath. The town is built on an extinct volcano, meaning you will have an end of day climb towards basecamp. These first two days are tough but by taking them at a steady pace you will have the chance to enjoy some impressive surrounding scenery.

Day 2

Day 3: Bath to Ludlow
distance: 99 miles
total climb: approx. 4,700ft

Heading out of Bath, you will pass the South-Western flank of the Cotswolds before crossing the immense Severn Bridge towards the beautiful Forest of Dean. From the River Wye in Chepstow, there is a long climb towards Hertfordshire before an more relaxing run towards Ludlow.

Day 3

Day 4: Ludlow to Haydock
distance: 105 miles
total climb: approx 2,300ft

Day 4 has the least amount of climbing of all the days. Crossing the edge of the Stipperstones before hitting the Shropshire and Cheshire plains around lunchtime, the ride will flatten out significantly around Knutsford. The landscape becomes more suburban as the route passes between Manchester and Liverpool on the approach to Haydock Park, crossing the toll bridge at the Manchester ship canal.

Day 4

Day 5: Haydock to Penrith
distance: 104 miles
total climb: approx 4,200ft

As the route then passes through Wigan and Preston the scenery improves, allowing views towards the Pennines to your right and out to the Blackpool Tower over the Fylde Coast to the left. The route then joins the A6 having headed in a northerly direction at Keswick. The highlight of Day 5 has to be taking on Shap Fell, from the top of which you will experience breath-taking views of the Lake District before a fantastic finish towards Hutton-in-the-Forest.

Day 5

Day 6: Penrith to Hamilton
distance: 100 miles
total climb: approx 2,800ft

The Ride from Hutton-in-the-Forest to Hamilton offers fantastic views of the Lowther Hills and passes through Carlisle, Gretna Green, Lockerbie and Annan Dale. Your camp for the night is at Hamilton racecourse on the southern edge of Glasgow.

Day 6

Day 7: Hamilton to Fort William
distance: 126 miles
total climb: approx 6,000ft

Day 7 is arguably the most challenging day after the climbs on days 1 and 2 in Devon and Cornwall. Beginning with a ride through the suburbs of eastern Glasgow the route then crosses the Campsie Fells, skirts the Trossachs and passes through Glen Ogle. Before finishing for the night at Fort William, Riders will cross Rannoch Moor and the world famous Glen Coe Pass. Despite the last ten miles being flat, at 126 miles and with 6,000ft of climbing, this is the longest stage of the route.

Day 7

Day 8: Fort William to Kyle of Sutherland
distance: 110 miles
total climb: approx. 4,900ft

Day 8 takes in some key landmarks of note, including the memorial of the unknown soldier and the banks of Loch Ness and riding through the Great Glen and a pit stop at Fort Augustus. Having ridden along the banks Loch Ness, the route will cut inland through Beauly and alongside Cromarty Firth, finishing at Balbair. The climbs on this day are manageable – it is worth noting that climbs in Scotland are much less steep but they do tend to go on…

Day 8

Day 9: Kyle of Sutherland to John O'Groats
distance: 104 miles
total climb: approx. 4,100ft

The long-awaited final day! And it never fails to impress. The undulating route takes in some of the remotest and most spectacular parts of the Scotland and offers some of the best riding anywhere in the UK. The days starts with a climb up to the two highest points of the stage – Cnoc Staign and Strath Vagastie – before winding through the Strathnaver Valley and on towards the rugged North Atlantic Coast and the finishing line at John O’Groats!

Day 9

Lands End to John O'Groats Route
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